Posted in Bipolar, Shared

We don’t see things the way they are. We see them the way we are.

This is an incredibly insightful post about how profoundly our interactions with others are interpreted through our own perceptions. We can never escape completely our perceptions because they are a product of everything that has ever happened to us.

“My own experience in counselling has helped me to understand just how influenced our perception is by things of which we are often unaware: traumatic events from the past, ideas about the world formulated in childhood, issues of one kind or another which we carry around as our personal set of “baggage.” And by strong emotions, like love, or fear.”

A very thoughtful post.

johnjzokovitch

This is a difficult post to write. Why will become clearer later on. But let’s start by talking about perception.

tumblr_mbqf1g9m3g1ray2h9o1_1280-1I think that most people would agree that perception is fallible: that every person is or has been guilty at some point in one’s life of misunderstanding another, of misjudging a situation, of filtering an experience through one’s own history or one’s own issues and misinterpreting what was really occurring. Sometimes our own past or our own fears color what see, feel and experience so much, that later we are stunned to realize just how wrong we were in our perception or in the actions we committed based on that perception.

I don’t think that this is headline news for most of us.

Perception is fallible; we are creatures who are always interpreting and filtering and we often misread and misunderstand. The people with whom we engage and the situations…

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Author:

I am not sure about anything but amazed by everything. I struggle with erratic moods. I don't know if it is a disorder, a gift, or a little bit of both, but I am going to try to embrace them, let myself feel them, and hopefully come out wiser on the other side.

7 thoughts on “We don’t see things the way they are. We see them the way we are.

  1. i don’t know what to say about this other than i have/have had problems like yours, as severe as yours. my husband saved my life time after time and never got angry with me. i did horrible things when manic and still he forgave me. he gives me his full support and that makes life worth living.

    hooray for supportive partners! i love the mushy stuff, btw.
    good for you! and i hope this trend continues. ❤

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you for commenting. It’s nice to hear there is someone else out there who has lived through what I have. It is even better to hear that you are blessed to have someone love you for you, whatever you have to struggled your way through. It is truly a beautiful, authentic love, and it is unconditional. It took me years and many fights will life to learn how true his love is for me. Once you know though, there is an overwhelming feeling of safety and peace that comes with it. Thank you again for your comment, I put myself out there a bit on that one so it feels good to know I am not alone. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Thank you! He’s the best!

        Addiction bears such a stigma. It’s hard to talk about it because so many people have a horrible preconceptions about what and addict is like. Worse is the way the think addictive people are doing it to party. Anyone who’s ever waited for their connection to call, for painfully stressful hours, knows there’s nothing fun about it.

        You were brave to tell your story. ❤

        Liked by 1 person

        1. It isn’t too long before the party is over and is takes a score to function normally. There is a poor perception because most addicts function (barely) like anyone else. Doctors, lawyers, teachers, addiction doesn’t discriminate. Stay well!

          Liked by 1 person

          1. yes! i was doing doing a lot of meth, E, and acid while i was in university and i got good grades and enjoyed myself. i guess school was enough motivation to keep me functioning, because not long after i graduated, things went downhill fast! 🙂

            thanks, you too! 😀

            Liked by 1 person

  2. I also think you see things in a different way than the “healthy” people. I take Lamotrigine, Ativan who have helped me from the deep depression I got a while ago. Have dimension pretty well since I got it but my periods when I am worried and a little down. Was diagnosed bipolar one a few years ago but has gone wrong medicated so I was constipated and my relationship was lost and my job. My life now is chaotic but feel better in body and soul, sincerely hope that I can be happy and have a nice life, but there are dreams I have.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I am glad you are feeling better. Many of up have lost a lot along the way to diagnosis and wellness. I sincerely hope that you stay well and know that there are always real people behind these sites that are more than happy to lend an ear. 🙂

      Like

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